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When using the Task Parallel Library, Wait() is a BAD warning sign

Take a look at the following code:

public static Task ParseAsync(IPartialDataAccess source, IPartialDataAccess seed, Stream output, IEnumerable<RdcNeed> needList)
{
    return Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
    {
        foreach (var item in needList)
        {
            switch (item.BlockType)
            {
                case RdcNeedType.Source:
                    source.CopyToAsync(output, Convert.ToInt64(item.FileOffset), Convert.ToInt64(item.BlockLength)).Wait();
                    break;
                case RdcNeedType.Seed:
                    seed.CopyToAsync(output, Convert.ToInt64(item.FileOffset), Convert.ToInt64(item.BlockLength)).Wait();
                    break;
                default:
                    throw new NotSupportedException();
            }
        }
    });
}

Do you see the problem in here?

It is a result of a code review comment about improper use of async in a project. This resulted in a lot of Task showing up in the return methods, but not in any measurable improvement in the actual codebase use of asynchronicity.

The problem is that when you need to work with such things in C# 4.0, you have to do some annoying things to get the code to work properly. In particular, this method was modified to be:

public static Task ParseAsync(IPartialDataAccess source, IPartialDataAccess seed, Stream output, IList<RdcNeed> needList, int position = 0)
{
  if(position>= needList.Count)
  {
        return new CompletedTask();
  }
  var item = needList[position];
  Task task;
            
  switch (item.BlockType)
  {
        case RdcNeedType.Source:
            task = source.CopyToAsync(output, Convert.ToInt64(item.FileOffset), Convert.ToInt64(item.BlockLength));
            break;
        case RdcNeedType.Seed:
            task = seed.CopyToAsync(output, Convert.ToInt64(item.FileOffset), Convert.ToInt64(item.BlockLength));
            break;
        default:
            throw new NotSupportedException();
  }

  return task.ContinueWith(resultTask =>
    {
        if (resultTask.Status == TaskStatus.Faulted)
            resultTask.Wait(); // throws
        return ParseAsync(source, seed, output, needList, position + 1);
    }).Unwrap();
}

This code is more complex, but it is actually making proper use of the TPL. We have changed the loop into a recursive function, so we can take advantage of ContinueWith to the next iteration of the loop.

And no, I can’t wait to get to C# 5.0 and have proper await work.

Reference: When using the Task Parallel Library, Wait() is a BAD warning sign from our NCG partner Oren Eini at the Ayende @ Rahien blog.

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