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Oren Eini

Comparing developers

Recently I had to try to explain to a non technical person how I rate the developers that I work with. In technical terms, it is easy to do:

int Compare(devA, devB, ctx)

But it is very hard to do:

int Compare(devA, devB);
var score = Evaluate(dev);

What do I mean by that? I mean that it is pretty hard (at least for me), to give an objective measure of a developer with the absence of anyone to compare him to, but it very easy to compare two developers, but even so, only in a given context.

An objective evaluation of a developer is pretty hard, because there isn’t much that you can objectively measure. I’m sure that no reader of mine would suggest doing something like measuring lines of code, although I wish it was as easy as that.

How do you measure the effectiveness of a developer?

Well, to start with, you need to figure out the area in which you are measuring them. Trying to evaluate yours truly on his HTML5 dev skills would be… a negative experience. But in their areas of expertise, measuring the effectiveness of two people is much easier. I know that if I give a particular task to Joe, he will get it done on his own. But if I give it to Mark, it will require some guidance, but finish it much more quickly.  And Scott is great at finding the root cause of a problem, but is prune to analysis paralysis unless prodded.

This came up when I tried to explain why a person spending 2 weeks on a particular problem was a reasonable thing, and that in many cases you need a… spark of inspiration for certain things to just happen.

All measurement techniques that I’m familiar with is subject to the observer effect, which means that you might get a pretty big and nasty surprise by people adapting their behavior to match the required observations.

The problem is that most of the time, development is about things like stepping one foot after the other, getting things progressively better by making numerous minor changes that has major effect. And then you have a need for brilliance. A customer with a production problem that require someone to have the entire system in their head all at once to figure out. A way to optimize a particular approach, etc.

And the nasty part is that there is very little way to actually get those sparks on inspiration. But there is usually a correlation between certain people and the number of sparks of inspiration per time period they get. And one person’s spark can lead another to the right path and then you have an avalanche of good ideas.

But I’ll talk about the results of this in another post.

Reference: Comparing developers from our NCG partner Oren Eini at the Ayende @ Rahien blog.
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